n°. 2

what is the meaning
of home?

grow up/grow out

On the meaning of home:
a place where I grow out of but also
where I always come back to, even if
we don’t share the same beliefs.

doubleshot studios

on the cover
<
joey chin

editor's note

When Walt Whitman wrote the line “I contain multitudes” in Song of Myself, he might as well have also been referring to the idea of home. Today, we live in an age of change, movement and paradigm shifts. Home is a question of what and how, when and why, rather than just where. You can experience multiple belongings all at once,or imagine a home you do not have yet. So we ask the question: What makes a home?

Samantha Lee and Joesan Arce talk about making homes out of the places in which they also work. Recipes by contributors Alvin Lee and Almshouse will tell you that home is in a taste, and can be replicated wherever you are. Olivia Azali, Open Studio and 0932 show us how design and architecture come together in their personal and professional capacities while Roy Tan expresses the desire for a more inclusive Singapore for the LGBT community.

Lastly, q zine is most grateful to Md Mukul Hossine and his publisher, Ethos Books for permission to feature two poems, Today My Mind’s Sky and Bangladesh, in this issue. And perhaps home for you is what he writes:

Someone at the horizon
Is calling me
Every time waving her hand

lai han phang

when on earth
am i home?!

me:
Dude, I’m writing an article for my friend’s magazine. The topic’s “What’s the meaning of home?” and I’m stuck as shit.

broseph:
Home is where you don’t have to wear underwear and it’s ok. This shit is deep. It’s a sense of total security, a break from the norm, desexualised being at home, no faux pas at home.

me:
That’s you being socially awkward. at’s why you keep having faux pas(es).

me:
Dude, I’m writing an article for my friend’s magazine. The topic’s “What’s the meaning of home?” and I’m stuck as shit.

broseph:
Home is where you don’t have to wear underwear and it’s ok. This shit is deep. It’s a sense of total security, a break from the norm, desexualised being at home, no faux pas at home.

me:
That’s you being socially awkward. at’s why you keep having faux pas(es).

As a political science student, home is everywhere (or anywhere, as long as you don’t have to put on some underpants). I’m unable to state a country because countries and states as political and social constructs have shifting boundaries. To answer what the meaning of home is, would be impossible. As much as I attempt to not succumb to these constructs, I cannot help but acknowledge the emotions I have for certain lands because of their cultures and ties I share.

I’ve spent the final hurdle of my adolescence in Sydney, during which, I’ve met people who would probably have a harder time answering this question. One of my greatest friends holds a Singapore passport and moved to Hong Kong when she was eight, and then to Sydney when she was 17. When I asked her where home is, she said she holds a Singapore passport and told me she is Singaporean, but never really answered the question. But when she did, she said it was difficult to pinpoint a location because all these places she has lived in played a part in shaping who she is now. “It’s the third culture kid syndrome. You people have higher rates of depression,” I had said, trying to annoy her.

I’m generally a person who takes a long time to give any credit to my emotions (largely attributed to the fact that I’m Asian), so it was only after I’ve returned to Singapore that I realized I might have fallen into the third culture kid trap. During my university days, I often wondered what my life would have been had I stayed in Singapore. Now that I’m in Singapore, I wonder what my life would have been if I stayed in Sydney. I’m never quite contented whether I’m in Singapore or Sydney. It becomes harder when your friends are from different places around the world.

Going to university as an international student allows you to meet people from different countries and maintaining these relationships cost a lot of money and time. But in exchange, you’re rewarded with new perspectives of people’s culture and that creates the first tie to making it home again. I guess it is still impossible to answer this question so follow what Broseph says. He’s always right (also because he claims to be a superior race).

As a political science student, home is everywhere (or anywhere, as long as you don’t have to put on some underpants). I’m unable to state a country because countries and states as political and social constructs have shifting boundaries. To answer what the meaning of home is, would be impossible. As much as I attempt to not succumb to these constructs, I cannot help but acknowledge the emotions I have for certain lands because of their cultures and ties I share.

I’ve spent the final hurdle of my adolescence in Sydney, during which, I’ve met people who would probably have a harder time answering this question. One of my greatest friends holds a Singapore passport and moved to Hong Kong when she was eight, and then to Sydney when she was 17. When I asked her where home is, she said she holds a Singapore passport and told me she is Singaporean, but never really answered the question. But when she did, she said it was difficult to pinpoint a location because all these places she has lived in played a part in shaping who she is now. “It’s the third culture kid syndrome. You people have higher rates of depression,” I had said, trying to annoy her.

I’m generally a person who takes a long time to give any credit to my emotions (largely attributed to the fact that I’m Asian), so it was only after I’ve returned to Singapore that I realized I might have fallen into the third culture kid trap. During my university days, I often wondered what my life would have been had I stayed in Singapore. Now that I’m in Singapore, I wonder what my life would have been if I stayed in Sydney. I’m never quite contented whether I’m in Singapore or Sydney. It becomes harder when your friends are from different places around the world.

Going to university as an international student allows you to meet people from different countries and maintaining these relationships cost a lot of money and time. But in exchange, you’re rewarded with new perspectives of people’s culture and that creates the first tie to making it home again. I guess it is still impossible to answer this question so follow what Broseph says. He’s always right (also because he claims to be a superior race).

roy tan

a place for
one and all

home is…
a place where the surroundings are familiar, where the landmarks have a connection and continuity with my childhood memories.

where I can easily meet the people I grew up with—for activities, for friendship, and for love.

where the weather is perennially warm and where my favourite food is a convenient distance away.

home is…
a place where the surroundings are familiar, where the landmarks have a connection and continuity with my childhood memories.

where I can easily meet the people I grew up with—for activities, for friendship, and for love.

where the weather is perennially warm and where my favourite food is a convenient distance away.

These are also what make a home for most Singaporeans. But I am different—I am a gay Singaporean. What other Singaporeans take for granted does not necessarily apply to me. We are a house-proud people. We constantly try to improve our homes.

Although Singapore will always be my home, there are things that can be improved for the LGBT community to make it a better domicile for all of us.

Unfortunately, unlike a house, the power to renovate our national home does not lie in our hands alone. We are dependent on society at large and on the government to make these changes. When I make love to my partner, I do not want to be technically committing a crime. Singapore should be my home, not my prison.

I would like to see positive images of LGBT Singaporeans portrayed on television. We are largely invisible in the mainstream media. The only public narratives of us allowed are negative ones of HIV infection, drug abuse and comical parodies.

I want to have all the rights that other Singaporeans enjoy—to be able to get married to the person I love, to adopt children or have them via assisted reproductive techniques, to enjoy the public housing subsidies that heterosexual couples are given, to have hospital visitation rights when my partner is ill, to have my assets distributed automatically to my spouse if I die intestate, and the list goes on.

Equality for all Singaporeans is enshrined in our Constitution. The latter should also specify the LGBT community. To leave us out is tantamount to relegating us to second-class citizenship. A home is less of one for a child when he is treated more shabbily than his siblings.

Taiwan has just legalised same-sex marriage. Gay Taiwanese now feel more accepted and equal in their society. This had made Taiwan a better home for them. Surely Singapore can develop the heart and the maturity to do just as well.

These are also what make a home for most Singaporeans. But I am different—I am a gay Singaporean. What other Singaporeans take for granted does not necessarily apply to me. We are a house-proud people. We constantly try to improve our homes.

Although Singapore will always be my home, there are things that can be improved for the LGBT community to make it a better domicile for all of us.

Unfortunately, unlike a house, the power to renovate our national home does not lie in our hands alone. We are dependent on society at large and on the government to make these changes. When I make love to my partner, I do not want to be technically committing a crime. Singapore should be my home, not my prison.

I would like to see positive images of LGBT Singaporeans portrayed on television. We are largely invisible in the mainstream media. The only public narratives of us allowed are negative ones of HIV infection, drug abuse and comical parodies.

I want to have all the rights that other Singaporeans enjoy—to be able to get married to the person I love, to adopt children or have them via assisted reproductive techniques, to enjoy the public housing subsidies that heterosexual couples are given, to have hospital visitation rights when my partner is ill, to have my assets distributed automatically to my spouse if I die intestate, and the list goes on.

Equality for all Singaporeans is enshrined in our Constitution. The latter should also specify the LGBT community. To leave us out is tantamount to relegating us to second-class citizenship. A home is less of one for a child when he is treated more shabbily than his siblings.

Taiwan has just legalised same-sex marriage. Gay Taiwanese now feel more accepted and equal in their society. This had made Taiwan a better home for them. Surely Singapore can develop the heart and the maturity to do just as well.

o p e n s t u d i o

ways of seeing

How differently (or similarly) do professionals in the industries of design and architecture perceive home? O P E N S T U D I O, Olivia Azali and 0932 Design Consultants show us how.

to make a home

For us, a home is all about the peculiarities and the habitual routines specific to whom it belongs. When we design a home, it is different from designing a house. We study and observe what is intrinsic as a starting point to craft the details that make a home.

to make a home

For us, a home is all about the peculiarities and the habitual routines specific to whom it belongs. When we design a home, it is different from designing a house. We study and observe what is intrinsic as a starting point to craft the details that make a home.

olivia azali

how to live at home

Home is not just about form and function but also the memories, and the people who live in it. Experiences of everyday routines and objects formed by their different daily habits, then become what we call our home.

dad mum oli kath
0932 design consultants

transmutable space

0932 Design Consultants give a summary of the TT Apartment Singapore Project, one of the most interesting interior explorations of using architectural built form to achieve permutable space. A transmutable space that is at once a luxurious extension into the living area—literally managed by the use of parallel lines in 3-dimensional geometry.

ethos books
joesan arce

Originally from Roxas City, province of Capiz in the Philippines, Joesan Arce has been living in Singapore the past 26 years. Working as a domestic helper in the same household the last two decades, Joesan has spent more than half her life here.

Tell us more about where you were born.

My province is known for its seafood and life is very slow paced, just like living in a kampong. We have a very nice beach too, and our common transportation is a tricycle and a jeep.

What do you remember about your home when you left?

In 1991, when I left for Singapore, I remember the green pastures right in front of my home, which was something I really liked. Then, you could see cows and goats, but now, houses occupy it.

Do you see your family often?

When my parents were still around, I always went back at the end of a two-year contract. Now that they’re no longer around, I do not go back often as the location of my home makes it inconvenient. But now that technology is so advanced, I often communicate with my siblings and family through WhatsApp and Viber.

Share with us your favourite thing about the Philippines and Singapore.

I love the beach in my province, and the atmosphere there. We can swim, catch starfishes and collect pretty seashells. I particularly enjoy the fresh air and seafood. But what I enjoy most is the time spent with my family and relatives.

In Singapore, everything is convenient and especially the transportation with the air-con that is different from the Philippines. But what I like most here is that there is no typhoon.

What did home mean to you previously and what does it mean to you now?

It is still the same for me. It is where I am part of the family, and where I feel most comfortable.

Where and what do you envision your home to be in the future?

I would prefer to have my home in my province. I envision it to be simple, cosy with everything in order. I actually do have a house in the Philippines, just that it needs renovation. Because of where we are located, a typhoon always hits us, damaging our house. I used to tell the kids I took care of that the roof had flown off.

Can you sing a few lines of Singapore’s national anthem?

I don’t know! Filipinos are good singers but in every rule, there is an exemption. I’m one of them. Marikita Sai Ya? Majulah Singapura. Okay, that’s all.

What would be a fond memory about your hometown and Singapore?

For my hometown, it would be playing with the kids on the streets and climbing the guava trees. In Singapore, it would be the time I spent with the three children, in my care, watching them grow from the time they were babies.

What is the funniest incident that happened to you in Singapore?

I was in a taxi from Tanglin Shopping Centre and wanted to go to Far East Shopping Centre. The driver asked if I was sure, and if I wanted to go to Far East Plaza instead. I said, “No, I’m going to Far East Shopping Centre.” He replied “Okay.” Then he started driving, made a turn, then looked back and pointed to a building. The meter did not even move. I was so embarrassed. In the end, he asked me to just give him two dollars.

What is the most Singlish expression you can come up with?

“Wait Lah!” Errrrr, “Go where?”

What is your favourite Filipino dish and why?

Oxtail soup! My mother would cook this on most Sundays. Although it takes quite some time, she always made it with patience and love.

What do you enjoy doing here during your pastime?

I often read Christian books and watch Korean variety shows.

Do you see yourself as part of the family after being with them all these years?

Yes, of course.

What makes you feel most at home here in Singapore?

Being at home with the family and the good relationship I have with each of the family members. We often watch and follow Korean dramas together.

What will you miss most if you ever leave Singapore?

The family. Singapore will always have a special place in my heart as it has my second family and is my second home.

samantha lee

my second

Samantha Lee is currently working at a senior activities centre in the eastern part of Singapore for almost eight months. Prior to this, she was in the building industry for many years. However, there was no job satisfaction, so she decided to quit last year.

Taking up a course in social work built up her passion to care for the elderly. That was when she started working as a programme coordinator at her current place which she considers “home”.

Home for Samantha consists of two blocks of flats—studio apartments built by the government, primarily for seniors. However, there are also bigger units—three and four roomers catering to newlyweds, and families with young children or aged parents in tow. My workplace is located on the ground floor of one of the blocks.

My job as a programme coordinator in the activities centre is both interesting and challenging. My role is to plan programmes, including morning exercises to help maintain the residents’ physical fitness, organise makan sessions, outings and festive occasions. We just celebrated our 2nd anniversary.

The Centre is also equipped with a kitchenette as well as a garden, where the residents can showcase their culinary skills or exercise their green thumb and grow all sorts of herbs and plants.

Taking up a course in social work built up her passion to care for the elderly. That was when she started working as a programme coordinator at her current place which she considers “home”.

Home for Samantha consists of two blocks of flats—studio apartments built by the government, primarily for seniors. However, there are also bigger units—three and four roomers catering to newlyweds, and families with young children or aged parents in tow. My workplace is located on the ground floor of one of the blocks.


My job as a programme coordinator in the activities centre is both interesting and challenging. My role is to plan programmes, including morning exercises to help maintain the residents’ physical fitness, organise makan sessions, outings and festive occasions. We just celebrated our 2nd anniversary.

The Centre is also equipped with a kitchenette as well as a garden, where the residents can showcase their culinary skills or exercise their green thumb and grow all sorts of herbs and plants.

There are different activities for the residents to participate in, enabling them to mingle and interact with one another. They are, therefore, very happy as these get-together sessions bring back fond memories of the good, old kampong days.

In addition to these activities, I also take care of the residents’ welfare. As they are mainly seniors who may be staying on their own or with their spouses, I frequently do home visits or give them a telephone call when I don’t see them coming down for the Centre’s activities.


Sometimes we counsel or lend a listening ear to those who suffer from depression or debilitating sickness. We also try to reach out to those from broken homes or dysfunctional family backgrounds.

My conclusion is that home is a place where love, acceptance and affirmation can be found, a place of caring and sharing, giving and taking, accepting and affirming the self and the other. It is not restricted to just blood relatives, but encompasses all those bound by genuine love, concern and care for one another, always seeking the best for others, rather than self.

There are different activities for the residents to participate in, enabling them to mingle and interact with one another. They are, therefore, very happy as these get-together sessions bring back fond memories of the good, old kampong days.

In addition to these activities, I also take care of the residents’ welfare. As they are mainly seniors who may be staying on their own or with their spouses, I frequently do home visits or give them a telephone call when I don’t see them coming down for the Centre’s activities.

Sometimes we counsel or lend a listening ear to those who suffer from depression or debilitating sickness. We also try to reach out to those from broken homes or dysfunctional family backgrounds.

My conclusion is that home is a place where love, acceptance and affirmation can be found, a place of caring and sharing, giving and taking, accepting and affirming the self and the other. It is not restricted to just blood relatives, but encompasses all those bound by genuine love, concern and care for one another, always seeking the best for others, rather than self.

alecia neo

romancing singapore

Romancing Singapore is part of an on-going project that explores societal expectations about the perfect life and success. The montage is made up of both still photographs and video stills extracted from video clips captured of a family invited to perform their dream life.

*originally produced in colour

romancing singapore

Romancing Singapore is part of an on-going project that explores societal expectations about the perfect life and success. The montage is made up of both still photographs and video stills extracted from video clips captured of a family invited to perform their dream life.

*originally produced in colour

jackson sim

home is:

As a digital marketer for St Regis Singapore and W Hotel Sentosa Cove, Jackson shares the hospitality trademarks that make someone feel right at home.

@questionzine
ashley chen

After a hard day at school or work, I like to take a long detour back home. Instead of the bus, I’d walk home from the MRT through the beach and the park, pass by a mall and then head home. It takes 30 minutes at times but really, the best thing about Pasir Ris is all that nature around it. I wouldn’t trade it for anything.

alvin lee

flavours of home

recipe one :
ngoh hiang

Ngoh hiang (Chinese fried meat roll) is something that I always look forward to when Chinese New Year is around the corner. Ah Ma will prepare large quantities of ngoh hiang in advance. Throughout the festive period, there is ngoh hiang during lunch and dinner. It will always be accompanied by her home-made chilli sauce and dark sweet sauce. Nothing beats this ngoh hiang, which sends a warm fuzzy feeling and makes you feel at home.

ingredients
40g beancurd skin (wipe both sides with slightly damp cloth)
1 egg white for securing the ngoh hiang
Vegetable oil for deep-frying

a : meat filling
500g minced pork belly
10 water chestnuts (peeled & chopped)
4 stalks of spring onions (chopped)
1 medium size carrot (chopped)

b : seasoning
1 tbsp light soy sauce
2 tsp five-spice powder
1/2 tsp white pepper powder
1 tbsp oyster sauce
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 rice wine
1 tbsp plain flour

directions

step one :
Add (a) to a large bowl and season with (b). Mix thoroughly and marinade in the fridge for at least 4 hours.

step two :
Wipe the beancurd skin with damp cloth. Scoop 2–2.5 tbsp of pork mixture onto it. Roll it until all the meat is in contact with the beancurd skin. Fold the sides and continue to roll till the end. Brush the egg wash at the end to seal it.

step three :
Steam the ngoh hiang in a steamer and make sure there's space between each piece. Steam for 10 minutes.

step four :
Heat vegetable oil in wok. Pan fry in batches, for about 2–3 minutes, until the ngoh hiang are golden brown. Drain excess oil on paper towels/tempura paper before serving.

almshouse

recipe two :
steamed seabass

This dish is based on the traditional steamed fish every Chinese Singaporean household knows and loves. In essence, the basic dish is made of steamed fish in soy sauce, usually accompanied by tofu and salted vegetables. We decided to reinterpret the dish, drawing inspiration from our European culinary training. Instead of steaming the vegetables together with the fish, we took another traditional element of Chinese cooking, the black fungus, reminiscent of the European mushroom, and cooked it wok hei, like many Chinese restaurants do with their vegetables.

ingredients

a : seabass
1 fillet of seabass, skin off Seabass skin
Corn flour

b : wok hei black fungus
Black fungus, hydrated
1 clove garlic, minced
Salt

c : shaoxing sauce
1 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp dark soy sauce
1 tbsp Shaoxing wine
2 tbsp water
75g butter, cubed

d : fried tau gua
1 block tau gua, cubed
Corn flour
Salt
Oil for frying

e: garnish
Sliced spring onion

directions

step one :
Prepare the Shaoxing sauce by combining all the ingredients and bring it to a boil, less the butter. Once the sauce is boiling, whisk in the butter, one cube at a time till emulsified.

step two :
Prepare the oil in a pot for deep-frying. Season the corn flour with salt and drench the tau gua with corn flour. Dust off the excess flour and deep-fry the tau gua till golden brown. Drain on a paper towel.

step three :
Prepare the fish skin by drenching it in corn flour. Dust off the excess flour and deep-fry till golden brown. Drain the skin on a paper towel

step four :
Prepare a pot with just enough oil to coat the bottom. Heat the oil till it just begins to smoke. Toss in the hydrated black fungus and garlic, and season with salt. Cook for about 2–3 minutes.

step five :
Prepare a steamer and steam the seabass fillet for 4–6 minutes, or until done, depending on the size.

christopher luke collins
house ≠ home

Dionne Warwick once crooned that a house is not a home. Evidently, her words
came from a place of hurt: deep in her heart, lamenting her mistake of letting a loved
one go, and the dread of entering an empty space now. But she was right to sing
it so: the words “house” and “home” have always been tossed interchangeably
—and these two words hold very different meanings.

After all, a house is nothing more than just a place for your stuff and here’s the thing:
if you don’t have so much stuff, there wouldn’t be a need for a house because that’s
all it really is for—a shelter for your pile of things (and hats off to George Carlin for
demystifying the role of a house, by the way).

But what about a home? Toss a bitcoin into the virtual realm and you’ll land yourself
15 online articles sharing ways to achieve the perfect home, complete with how to
make floor-to-ceiling windows that will beckon the light to float in gently, plus one
of those $999.95 couches to make your nights in cosy and inviting.

You don’t question these articles, because in our consumerism-driven world, there’s
a sale on top of a sale, dictating us to buy it soon, today, now, because you’re worth it
—you’ve worked hard and you’ve got the money to burn, so why not make your
after working hours life a little more comfortable?

But what if I say that we have all been fooled— that a house doesn’t really have to
be confined within an actual 4-wall perimeter physical place filled with things?
In a primate study conducted, it was suggested that our desire for a special haven
isn’t one of a luxury, but more of a deep biological need. Monkeys when in need of
a respite would seek out their secure base, and thus, lowering their stress hormones.
Now for us humans, the more evolved monkeys, what would be our secure base?

In ideal and wholesome situations, it is none other than when we began our lives
nested safely with our mothers and the familiar scent, warmth and tenderness.

And, cheesy as it might seem, this is slowly replicated in our loved ones that we find
later in our lives. We could be travelling around the world for an indefinite amount
of time, but if certain things remain constant, that’s home right there.

Warwick was correct to sing how you can have rooms and furniture to fill
up every corner of a house— yet a home, it doesn’t transform itself into.

Because a home is only good with the people inside, or the memories that a certain
spot of the house evokes. One where we could even walk through the place blindfolded,
and end up at our destination unharmed. And if you have kids, you know
it’s also one that’s filled with marks on the walls charting their growth. It is not one
where the architects were brought in to design, or the items bought to fill up a void.
The feeling of being at home—of being in a place that you can now call home
—cannot be achieved through the dropping of cash— it’s formed through an intimate
relationship between us and our personal place— a physical perimeter, or with another person.

denise nicole yap

contributors

Almshouse

Instagram: @almshousedining

A collaboration focused on quality food and a unique dining experience.

Josean Arce

An overseas foreign worker, Filipino working in Singapore for 26 years.

Olivia Azali

Girl (25), still learning how to architect at work & her own life.

Ashley Chen

Instagram: @gnarlywarlyyy

An illustrator and a graphic design student currently studying in NTU ADM.

Christopher Luke Collins

A lawyer during the day (and all through the night) hailing from Basildon, he drinks sugarless tea and enjoys a bit too many chocolate digestives.

Ethos Books

ethosbooks.com.sg

An independent book publisher based in Singapore that gives a voice to emerging and exciting writers from diverse backgrounds.

Alvin Lee

YouTube: cultlinary
Instagram: @cultlinary

An ex-cabin crew turned home chef, who enjoys inviting friends over and experimenting different recipes during the weekends.

Samantha Lee

A programme coordinator with a heart for the elderly. She loves interacting and learning from others.

Md Mukul Hossine

Writer of “Me Migrant”, he was born in Patgram, Bangladesh. Arriving in Singapore in 2008, he has been working in its construction sector. He writes poems, novels, and short stories. Every night, Mukul leaves behind his day’s work, and sings with pen on paper. These poems speak his life stories.

Alecia Neo

alecianeo.com
unseenart.co

A visual artist based in Singapore, who questions the kinds of individuals who are valued by contemporary society by exploring the relationships between people, their identities and contexts.

O P E N S T U D I O

open-studio.sg
Instagram: @openstudio.sg

A spatial planning and design practice. As in its name, the team is open-minded and values the idiosyncrasies of their clients, knowing that it aids defining each project as a unique solution.

Lai Han Phang

Lived in Sydney for seven years. Though pretty mainstream as it is she’s definitely not lusting to wander.

Jackson Sim

Instagram: @misnoskcaj

A digital marketer by profession, and food lover by passion.

Doubleshot Studios

Instagram: @doubleshotstudios

Two full-time photographers by day, part-time dog slaves by night. 

Roy Tan

Facebook: roy.tan.733

A healthcare professional passionately interested in documenting Singapore LGBT culture and history.

Denise Nicole Yap

Instagram: @deniseardenise
Behance: deniseardenise

A freelance illustrator, graphic designer, and a proud mother of a very fat corgi.

0932 Design Consultants

Instagram: @0932design
Behance: 0932design

An award-winning architectural and interior design practice based in Singapore, formally founded in 2011.

issues

1
the letter q
3
what is stepping in, out, or around the self like?
2
what is the meaning of home
4
is it always black or white?
1
the letter q
2
what is the meaning of home?
3
what is stepping in, out, or around the self like?
4
is it always black or white?

about

The oeuvre of the zine seeks to ask questions—sometimes unique, sometimes nondescript, sometimes commonsensical, to get a variety of responses. Our contributors range from children to industry professionals—so there is always something asked or answered with a fresh perspective.

publisher & editor
qu’est-ce que c’est design

8a cuff road
singapore 209719

enquiries

info@quest-ce.com

content

grow up/grow out editor’s note when on earth am i home?! a place for one and all ways of seeing me migrant home away from home my second home
romancing singapore home is : social media q&a mapping pasir ris flavours of home house ≠ home no place like home